Poland’s fate is decided by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill at Yalta in February. Polish warships enter the German naval base at Wilhelmshaven following its capture by Polish Forces under General Maczek on 6th May. In post-war operations Polish destroyers are deployed to scuttle the German U-Boat fleet from November 1945 – February 1946.

Jerzy Świrski

Chief of the Polish Naval Command, Rear Admiral See Wall of Names

Summary of the elite Polish Navy during WW2.

Jerzy Świrski

Rear-Admiral Jerzy Świrski

The Polish Navy, fighting in exile from G.B. with the Royal Navy, was an elite service numbering only 3,720 officers and sailors on 1st July 1945. Yet the achievements of the Polish Navy to the Allied WW2 effort were both distinguished and heroic and included the participation in the major theatres of War – September 1939 campaign, Battle of the Atlantic, Arctic Convoys, the Mediterranean, operations in Narvik, Dunkirk, the Lofoten Islands, Tobruk, Dieppe and the allied landings in Normandy and Italy.

British First Lord of the Admiralty said of the Polish Navy in 1944:

In view of its small size, the number of operations in which the Polish Navy has taken a part is almost incredible”.

Commencing with seven fighting vessels of their own the Polish Navy manned forty-five all told; seven of which were lost.

-          The Polish Navy sailed a total of 1,213,000 miles

-          787 convoys were escorted

-          1,162 combat patrols carried out

-          431 Polish sailors lost their lives

-          51 officers and other ranks were awarded the Virtuti Militari

The Polish Navy numbered 943 men in 1939, rising to a complement of over 4,000 by 1945. In addition to hard won victory, the majority of sailors lost their country. In all eleven Polish vessels were lost during the war, including three major liners, as troopships, the Piłsudski, Chrobry and Warszawa.

Between 1939 and 1946 132 officer cadets graduated, and 50 officers successfully completed expert courses in training centres all over the UK.

Polish expertise during the war, for example, produced direction finders which were able to track the bearings of short-wave broadcasts to Nazi submarines, an important element in the defeat of the U-boats in the battle of the Atlantic.

Source: ‘Poles Apart: Polish Naval Memories of WW2’ by Martin Hazell


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