List: Iranian Archive 1942-1945

Lists of persons preserved in the Polish Embassy in Tehran, Iran from 1942 to 1945.
All documents can be downloaded from here: Iranian Archive 1942-1945
View the list of the persons from this data source.

FOREWORD:
In 1942, in Iran were tens of thousands of Polish civilian and military refugees. More than 120,000 Poles came to Iran as a result of the evacuation of the Polish Army under the command of Maj. Gen. Anders from the Soviet Union by sea and land. This included over 77,000 soldiers and over 43,000 civilians, including nearly 20,000 children who miraculously survived the forced labour hell.
For the vast majority of them, Iran was only a way-station on their military path or on their further journey to quieter, war-free countries. Many of them, however – having experienced Soviet prisons and labour camps, poverty, exile and disease – remained forever on Iranian soil, and their graves there are a testament to the dramatic fate of the Poles forcibly exiled from their homeland. The journey of exile ended in Iran for over 2,900 Polish refugees, soldiers and civilians.
Courtesy of Poland’s Embassy in Tehran, Polish archives were provided invaluable material documenting the fate of Poles whose wartime exile tossed them into Iran.
These documents, called the “Iranian Archive 1942-1945”, include:
• birth and baptism registries (2 volumes),
• indexes of civilians who died in Iran and the USSR (3 volumes),
• indexes and registers of military who died in Iran and Iraq (3 volumes),
• lists of those who died in Iran during the years 1942-1944
• indexes of refugee names and passport records as of August 26 1946
• lists of refugees, including those evacuated to East Africa, India, Mexico and New Zealand.
These documents were discovered after many years, on the eve of the 60th anniversary of the evacuation of Poles from the Soviet Union to Iran and became the basis of the Council’s book “Poles in Iran 1942-1945″. Making the full Iran Archive 1942-1945 available to the academic community and other interested persons will undoubtedly form an invaluable contribution to the remembrance of the Poles’ exile during World War II.”
Andrzej Przewoźnik
Secretary of the Council for the Protection of Struggle and Martyrdom
Warsaw, April 2003.